IWC Releases 27 Portugieser Replica Watches in Honor of American Founder

— The $157 limited-edition timepiece is designed for fans of the Portugieser line.

The International Watch Company (now IWC) was founded in 1868 by an American from a small town in New Hampshire. Having made watches since he was 16, Florentine Ariosto Jones started the company in Schaffhausen, Switzerland, before he turned 30, with the hopes of selling well-made Swiss replica watches to an American audience. It didn’t quite turn out that way; less than a decade later, he was removed from the company and returned to the U.S. IWC survived the break and is now one of the best-known watch brands in the world—and it doesn’t hold a grudge.

The Portugieser Tourbillon Hand-Wound Edition “D. H. Craig USA.”

Despite those rocky years, IWC announced that, in an effort to honor Jones, it will make a limited edition of 27 units of a fake watch it’s calling the Portugieser Tourbillon Hand-Wound Edition “D.H. Craig USA,” timed to hit the market on the centenary of Jones’s death.


And what’s in that name and why the odd number?

The number 27 is a nod to Jones’s age when he founded the company, and the name “D.H. Craig” belongs to Jones’s uncle. (Back story: The watchmaker’s most famous mechanism while he was running IWC replica in Switzerland was called the Jones 2N Pattern H caliber, and he had his uncle’s name inscribed in the metal to honor the man he viewed as a mentor. Putting someone’s name on a watch movement as a tribute was a common practice then.)


The watch itself is a spin on the manual Portugieser Tourbillon, with the tourbillon beating at the 9 o’clock hour on the face. Like previous offerings, the case is rose gold, but here the hands and indexes are blued steel, which increases overall legibility and adds an appropriately vintage feel to the piece.


F.A. Jones’s signature is on the face, and alongside the sapphire caseback you can see “D.H. Craig” stamped into the gold, as well as its unit number (1 to 27). The replica watch is water-resistant to 30 meters and holds its power for 54 hours. Collectors who buy one will also get a numbered passport made by the same shoemaker (Santoni) who created the black alligator strap for the watch.

The Portugieser Tourbillon Hand-Wound Edition “D.H. Craig USA” will be sold for $157 only at boutiques in New York and London.

In tandem with this new release, IWC is teaming up with an organization called Save America’s Clocks, which aims to document and preserve street clocks across the country. Together they will target a specific clock in New York to save and maintain.


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What Swiss Replica Watches Tell Us About Goldman Sachs Bankers


Show me your watch and I’ll show you what rank you are at Goldman Sachs: a former banker mocks the material hierarchy at the U.S. investment bank.

GS Elevator Gossip is well-known for transporting Goldman Sachs’ secrets gleaned in trips up and down the 44 floors of the investment bank’s Manhattan headquarters.

The mysterious blogger’s identity was revealed two years ago: Elevator is the brainchild of John LeFevre, a former Citigroup syndicated loan banker in Asia who never actually worked at Goldman Sachs.

LeFevre has parlayed a popular Twitter account which portrays Goldman’s bankers in a unfavorable light into a book deal. According to LeFevre, the content is authentic; the book was panned by critics.

Business Insider has published LeFevre’s views about one of the most style-conscious issues on Wall Street: luxury replica watches and how to wear them.


Getting into Goldman Sachs is incredibly difficult: tends of thousands apply every year for an internship. So if you do make it, you shouldn’t cock it up with the wrong watch. Your choice should show that money isn’t important – because you have it already.

But your watch shouldn’t be ostentatious enough to irritate your older colleagues. A stainless steel replica Rolex Oyster Datejust or an Omega Seemaster.



You’ve passed the obstacle course and got hired on a permanent contract, so get ready for long work days and anxiety-fraught sleepless nights. Your salary isn’t all that either, but you still have to show you belong to Goldman Sachs. The classic entry-level watch is a Rolex Submariner – versatile and conspicuous at the same time.



You’re taking client meetings now, so leaving a good impression is even more important. Elevator recommends a Rolex Seadweller or a Blancpain Aqua Lung – neither too pretentious nor too shabby.



Your payday is finally more like what you would associate with Goldman Sachs. There’s only one watch for this level: a Rolex Daytona. Elevator says there is an unwritten rule against wearing one before reaching the vice-president rank. If you already have a Rolex, go for a Vacherin Constantin Overseas.



You’re making real money but also coping with serious stress and you have three years to climb to the pinnacle – Managing Director. Wear a Breguet Classique or a Jaeger LeCoultre Master Tourbillon to exude cool confidence.


Avoid any reference to Patek Philippe: an impatient director was seen with a picture of one tacked to his wrist – he now works for Morgan Stanley.

The IWC Portuguese is also a poor choice: it’s a fake watch associated with losers whose wives cheat on them.

Managing Director

Now is the time to get that Patek Philippe replica if you’ve been dreaming of it, although as the advertisement says, you never really own one, you merely look after it for the next presumably very entitled generation.


Permissible alternatives: the Nautilus Chronograph for $500 or the Perpetual Calendar for $930.


You can go toe-toe-toe with Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein, but your flirtation with expensive replica watches is over. All your previous acquisitions have been given away or are sitting in a neglected drawer at home.

To show that you’re still one of the 99 percent despite your millions, wear a $66 Swatch like Blankfein does, or a fitness wearable.


Even better, don’t wear a watch at all: When you control time, you don’t need to know what time it is, says LeFevre.

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Best Breitling Superocean Heritage Chronoworks Watch Hands-On


This Breitling Superocean Heritage Chronoworks replica watch costs about $400. If you haven’t already noticed, pricing doesn’t always seem to make sense in the watch world. There are times when otherwise interesting replica watches are marred by having retail prices which simply confound the consumer’s sense of reason. Sometimes those prices are actually too high, and other times the prices are fair but the consumer doesn’t understand or appreciate the reason for the high cost. In either event, pricing practices often don’t meld with consumer expectations or perceived values. It is perhaps the biggest “issue” the luxury industry faces, given the highly active watch lover community, and the conversations contained therein, that seek to validate or veto many decisions the watch industry makes.


At Baselworld 2016, Breitling shared with us this new “Chronoworks” version of the Superocean Heritage. “Chronoworks” is a term I haven’t heard before from Breitling, and it sounds like their version of a tuning shop where they tweak movements for better performance. In this case, the Breitling Chronoworks team began with their already in-house-made Breilting caliber B01 automatic chronograph. Breitling points to “five innovations” in the movement which, after the “optimization” from their “performance lab” (Chronoworks), is now called the caliber BC01.


What are the innovations? The question isn’t really “what,” but rather “if” these add up to the price Breitling is asking. The innovations in the movement added by the Chronoworks performance lab are a ceramic baseplate and gear-train bridges (versus metal), silicon wheels, a silicon escapement, a variable-inertia balance wheel, and elastic toothing. That all sounds cool, but what does it actually cost and what are the performance gains?

All of these features essentially act to do a few things. First is to reduce the propensity for parts to wear out, to reduce friction, to remove the effects of magnetism, to increase accuracy, and to decrease service times. Breitling doesn’t per se mention all this, but I can tell you what the point of all these parts is. Interestingly enough, all of this is a source of great controversy in the traditional watch industry. It has to do with the fact that metal parts are being replaced by non-metal parts. If the movements are still mechanical then why all the fuss?


Some watchmakers are concerned that unlike metal parts which can be reproduced relatively easily, things like ceramic or silicon parts will not be easy to replicate in the future when the movements need to be repaired or serviced. That is technically true, but it is only based on today’s available technology. We simply don’t know if in the near future the technology will exist to rapidly produce parts in silicon or ceramic. However, I do agree that the availability of parts in the future is an issue when it comes to non-metallic movement parts.

Another less convincing (for me) complaint about non-metal parts is that, unlike traditional steel, brass, gold, etc., the surfaces of non-metallic parts cannot be decorated. That is true to an extent. You can polish ceramic, but you can’t really engrave it. Silicon, you can’t do much to at all, and at the end of the day these parts simply will not be as attractive as metal parts. Why a mechanical watch if it is not beautiful, they ask?


I do appreciate the sentiment of this argument, but I don’t think it will hold a lot of ground in the long term. In my opinion, watch brands have an obligation to offer consumers choice, and it is the consumers who will choose what they want to put their money into. For those who can afford Philippe Dufour’s level of finishing and beauty, then they will easily sacrifice pure performance for beauty. People wanting a reliable everyday wear that isn’t an electronic fake watch might be better served by a movement made up entirely of non-metallic parts. Truly, that is where I hope we are headed. Brands from Ulysse Nardin to Breitling have been spending years playing with non-metallic parts. When are we going to finally see industrialized movements made with no metal, or minimal metal?


From a performance perspective, the BC01 movement has 100 hours of power reserve, up from the 70 hours of the B01. That is pretty much the only real metric I think Breitling has published on the improved performance. However, I believe that I heard them mention a reported 75% increase in performance over time in the BC01 versus the B01. I am not totally sure what that means, but a 75% improvement in accuracy and reliability seems promising. Perhaps, even $400-promising to the right collectors.


The movement otherwise continues to operate at 4Hz (28,800bph) and includes a 12-hour chronograph, date, and, of course, the time. Through the sapphire crystal caseback of the watch you can see the movement. Clearly, it is different than the stock B01 with all the black parts and some unique elements. With that said, in my opinion, too many of the parts are still unfinished right out of being machined, and at these prices, I think some consumers might expect a bit of hand-finishing. Why, on a sports watch? It really goes to the part of what a “performance lab” in the high-end replica watch world might need to be. I think the expectation by many consumers is that if Breitling tells the tale of how they took their stock movement and handed it to some exclusive Chronoworks lab in their manufacture, the movement will come out working better and looking better as a result.


For me, that is the type of value proposition that can equal $400. I want the Chronoworks watches to be more or less the same sports watches the brand sells at a fraction of the price but…. highly over-engineered and decorated. Like if Porsche make a few versions of the Carrera by hand with hand-shaped body panels and a carefully tweaked engine. It would be like a coach-built Carrera only for insane collectors who can appreciate that stuff. Well, that is at least my feelings on a possible future angle Breitling could choose to take with their Chronoworks watches.


In addition to the BC01 movement (which, of course, is COSC chronometer certified – as though any one cares anymore given the far superior standards out there now. Speaking of which, why doesn’t COSC just up their game a bit?), the Breitling Superocean Heritage Chronoworks sports a 46mm-wide case and rotating bezel. Case quality is actually really nice in terms of polishing and overall feel. The dial also has a unique design among other Breitling Superocean Heritage timepieces. I wouldn’t call it an upgrade, but it is a bit different. I do like to see brands like Breitling experiment.


Matched to the 100-meter-water-resistant black ceramic case is a new rubber strap (“Aero Classic”) that is meant to resemble the look of Breitling’s mesh metal bracelet you can get with other versions of the Breitling Superocean Heritage. I do think that Breitling should have included this strap in addition to doing a black-coated steel or titanium version of their otherwise polished steel mesh metal bracelet. That would have helped the value proposition of the replica watches a bit more. Rubber is nice and all, but in terms of presentation, you just can’t beat a nice solid metal bracelet.


It is difficult to predict where Breitling will take their Chronoworks products in the future. They certainly need to share the story a lot better and explain where the source of value is. Moreover, I think that this can be Breitling’s “over-engineering lab” where their core stock of replica watches are sometimes turned into incredible limited editions with elaborate finishing and performance tweaks that would simply not make sense in any higher-volume production collection of products.


Putting things back into context, the Valjoux 7750-based replica Breitling Superocean Heritage Chronograph costs about $160, whereas the replica Breitling B01-based Chronomat watches cost about $90. Breitling is asking a lot more for the limited edition of 100 pieces reference SB0161E4/BE91-256S replica Breitling Superocean Heritage Chronoworks that has a retail price of $325.

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